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Crafting a Thesis

Page history last edited by Mr. Hengsterman 7 months, 2 weeks ago

 

 

Crafting a Thesis for College Level Essays

 

READ THE PROMPT: Many students want to read the question quickly and move on to writing. However, college level essay prompts are challenging. They ask students to perform specific writing tasks and will require you to identify specific and important information prior to constructing a response The questions also contain qualifiers that guide and restrict your answer. Rather than taking 10 seconds to read the question, you would be better off spending 45 seconds reading, re-reading, marking, and analyzing. Remember, a mistake in understanding a question could make the rest of a student’s effort almost worthless.

 

 

 

 

FORMULATE YOUR THESIS:  The purpose of a thesis is to clearly lead the reader through your essay. A solid thesis will clearly make a claim or argument and provide organized/categorized  evidence to forecast what the essay will be about.

 

Think of your thesis as the “road map” to your essay. It will provide the reader with the stops along the way to the final destination—the conclusion  

 

 

Thesis/Claim: Student responds to the prompt with a historically defensible thesis/claim that establishes a line of reasoning.  To earn a THESIS POINT on the AP Rubric, your thesis must make a claim that responds to the prompt rather than restating or rephrasing the prompt. The thesis must consist of one or more sentences located in one place, either in the introduction or the conclusion. 

 

 

 

The THESIS should be the final sentence of your opening paragraph. The opening PARAGRAPH should have three identifiable elements:

 

 

Element #1: Set the Historical Context

This should be to 2-3 sentences setting the historical context for the essay prompt.

 

 

Element  #2:  State Claim/Argument

This element should tell the reader what the argument or claim you will attempt to prove. 

 

 

Element #3: Organized your Categories 

This element should organize your evidence and forecast  what the essay will be focusing on.

 

 



Be sure to make your C.A.S.E in your thesis statement 

 

C  - Establish the historical CONTEXT

 

A -  State your ARGUMENT 

 

S -  Organize SPECIFIC

 

E -  EVIDENCE 

 



 

Practice: The Coffee Thesis

 



Thesis Statement - Slavery in the South  [ 5 minute Work Window]

 

We are creating a Google Doc that will contain all of of our thesis practice for the fall semester

 

1. Go to Google Drive

 

2. Create Google Doc and name it  “ Your Last Name - Thesis”   For example - Hengsterman Thesis

 

3. Paste the following prompt: 

 

How did economic, geographic, and social factors encourage the growth of slavery as an important part of the economy of the southern colonies between 1607 and 1775? 

 

4. For HW please construct a thesis statement for the prompt.  You DO NOT need to upload the file. 

 

5. Make sure completed thesis file is in your CHS Folder



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How did economic, geographic, and social factors encourage the growth of slavery as an important part of the economy of the southern colonies between 1607 and 1775?    

 

 

 

The French and Indian War (1754-1763) altered the relationship between Britain and its North American colonies. Assess this change with regard to TWO of the following in the period between 1763 and 1775. Land acquisition, politics, economics  

 

 

 


The ability and the willingness the Framers had for compromise was reflected in the creation of a constitution that successfully addressed the needs of the young republic. Explain how the following reflect the validity of this statement: Representation, Slavery democratic rights

 

 

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