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The Century Episodes

Page history last edited by Mr. Hengsterman 6 years, 9 months ago

Under Construction

 

 

BOOM and BUST (Episode Study Guide) and Boom and Bust on YouTube

The 1920s ushered in an era of great social change, general prosperity, Prohibition and what historians refer to as “modernity.” This episode examines these great cultural changes and their affects on the nation. The 1920s, in stark contrast to the Victorian era, “roared,” as bathtub gin flowed and more and more Americans moved to urban areas. But the decade also saw limited prosperity for many, especially farmers, and the unrest and discord between the values of small town America and the rapid pace of science and technology. The optimism of the decade would end in the most severe economic depression in American history. Episode 3 presents some of the major events that shaped the decade including The Scopes Monkey Trial, Prohibition, the rise of leisure pastimes, and the impact of inventions such as the automobile, radio, movies and electricity.

 

 

STORMY WEATHER

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wil1ePlT1xs

 

 

 

 

THE BEST YEARS Episode Study Guide) and The Best Years  on YouTube

After the initial jubilation at the end of World War II, America faced severe domestic demographic problems and the international specter of communism and the Cold War. In response to the serious housing shortages exacerbated by the high marriage rates and subsequent baby boom of returning soldiers and the girls they left behind, the Truman administration created the GI Bill, which enabled veterans to secure low interest mortgages and college educations. But the domestic bliss of new homes and growing families could not alleviate the growing fears and hysteria of the new atomic age, and a demagogue from Wisconsin, Senator Joseph McCarthy, harnessed this hysteria for his personal political success. This episode covers some of the major events of the immediate post-war years such as the Korean War, McCarthyism, the Marshall Plan, the Berlin Airlift and the adjustment of returning soldiers.

 

 

HAPPY DAZE (Episode Study Guide) and Happy Days on YouTube

The election of Dwight Eisenhower in 1952 ushered in one of the most prosperous eras in American history. The shortages of the war were a distant memory as consumers rushed to spend their wartime savings on the new homes, cars and appliances that were now abundant. The nuclear family as the haven from political and atomic anxiety depended on rigid gender roles and consumption, and television provided the images of themselves  that Americans wanted to see. But beneath the complacency of the era lurked the indicators of a society waiting to rebel, and the realties of a nation divided by racial and

class conflicts. This episode examines the “Happy Days” of the 1950s and the major events of those years such as the Baby Boom, suburbanization, the advent of television, Civil Rights, Brown v. Board of Education, youth rebellions and the fears of a society

 

 

POISONED DREAMS (Episode Study GuidePoisoned Dreams on YouTube

The first few years of the 1960s promised a greater, stronger and more unified America than ever. America, as the undisputed leader of the free world, straddled the globe like Colossus. But within a few years the optimism of the first years of the decade would vanish, only to be replaced by the uncertainty of a new and unfamiliar world, and the national mourning of a fallen leader. This episode covers the years 1960-1963, and examines the events of the era such as the lunch counter sit-ins at Greensboro, North Carolina, the Kennedy years, the Cuban Missile Crisis and America’s increasing involvement in Vietnam. The episode ends with the assassination of Kennedy and the loss of American innocence.

 

UNPINNED  (Episode Study Guide)  Unpinned on YouTube

After the assassination of John F. Kennedy in November of 1963, America stood on the brink of domestic conflict and entrenched in the quagmire of the Vietnam War.  The years 1963 through 1968 remain some of the most violent and destructive years of  American history.  This episode examines some of the major events of those turbulent  years, including the murder of three civil rights workers in 1964, Freedom Summer,  student protest and the Students for a Democratic Society, Lyndon Baines Johnson’s Great Society, the counterculture, the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy, and the 1968 Democratic convention.  

 

APPROACHING THE APOCALYPSE (Episode Study Guide) Approaching the Apocalypse on YouTube

The turbulence of the 1960s paved the way for the election of Richard Nixon.  Distraught at the violence and unrest of the nation, Nixon’s “Silent Majority” voted loudly.  But the turmoil of the decade continued with riots and generational conflicts, and, despite the success of Apollo 11 and Nixon’s historic trip to China, the era ended in the disgrace of Watergate and the fall of Saigon.

 

 

STARTNG OVER (Episode Study Guide) Starting Over on YouTube

In the aftermath of the turmoil of the 1960s and the disillusionment of Watergate, Americans turned to Jimmy Carter in an attempt to return to small-town values. But Carter’s inability to deal with the overwhelming social, economic and political problems paved the way for a new conservatism led by Ronald Reagan, and the jubilation of the 1976 Bicentennial Celebration gave way to the despair and embarrassment of the Iranian Hostage Crisis. This episode examines the mid and late 1970s and some of the major events of the era such as the energy crisis, racial unrest, the rise of the “Me Generation,” unemployment and inflation, and the problems with Iran.

A NEW WORLD (Episode Study Guide) A New World on YouTube
As the 1970s gave way to the 1980s, Americans were ready for a more conservative leader and they found the answer to their quest in Ronald Reagan. Reagan’s folksy ways and familiar face created an aura of trust and he became one of America’s most popular presidents. But Reagan’s homespun ways could not forestall the economic crises of the 1980s and the widening economic divide between the haves and the have-nots. This episode examines some of the major events of the 1980s including the recession, aids, Wall Street, MTV, terrorism, televangelism and the fall of communism

 

 

 

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